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Stress-related pains and idiopathic disorders

    Anxiety and stress are thought to be important factors in many health problems.

Recent studies found strong direct causal relationships between stress, anxiety and pain, as well as several idiopathic disorders.

Pain in the muscles and joints is often associated with stress and anxiety. Musculoskeletal pain localized in the lower back, shoulders, and arms appears frequently to be unrelated to any somatic disease and thus bears all indications of having psychological causes.

Psychological distress plays a significant role in the severity of back pain. Other research suggests that musculoskeletal pain may be caused by multiple factors such as psychosocial environment, individual personality, specific behaviours, and mental stress. Some studies have clearly associated job dissatisfaction and depression to back problems.

By releasing stress and anxiety, your body creates a loop of positive feedback through the autonomic nervous system. This feedback can lead to significant improvement in symptoms of your stress and anxiety related pain and idiopathic issue.

When it comes to a fractured bone, the standard medical approach is to align and immobilize the bone and then let it heal. Because this approach to a broken bone, always works. When dealing with chronic anxiety or stress, neuro-linguistic-programming, EFT, art-therapy, mindfulness, yoga, craniosacral therapy, gravity blanket, mini-horses therapy and many other approaches, based on very contradictory scientific models are available to tackle the problem.

Yet, the empirical approach in somatic hypnotherapy is the only one to support its promise to uproot and winnow away stress, anxiety and emotional trauma with not only the guarantee of "no cure - no pay" but with the promise of experiencing your good results on the spot. Because just like the antivenom that reacts almost instantly if it is the right one, you will experience the good results of your somatic hypnosis immediately after your session.

The following pains and idiopathic conditions may be aggravated, triggered or caused by anxiety and stress, or may be conditions for which you may be at increased risk if you are exposed to prolonged or intense anxiety and stress.

Body Parts that are often pained by stress: “Studies have found those who experience stress and anxiety, tense and constrict their muscles, causing fatigue and cramps over time. You may be familiar with conditions such as headaches and IBS resulting from stress, but its adverse effects can be further reaching. Stress-related symptoms can result from unresolved emotional problems. Studies have shown that chronic pain might not only be caused by physical injury but also by stress and emotional issues. Often, physical pain functions to warn a person that there is still emotional work to be done.”

Back Pain "Back pain can be stress related. Anxiety and Stress can cause back pain, stiffness, tension, pressure, soreness, muscle spasms or immobility in the back. When people are experiencing bouts of stress or anxiety, muscle tighten leading to spasms and spinal misalignment. When the muscles tighten, it squises the blood vessels reducing the blood flow and causes pain."

Back Pain "No one would disagree that having back and neck pain causes stress, but what about the other way around? Can stress be the primary cause of your back pain? Dr. Sarno theorizes that stress can manifest as muscle tension and spasms which cause severe back pain. While it's only a theory, many spine professionals do believe that stress can be the primary cause of back pain."

Cough "Many of us have experienced a feeling of something stuck in our throats. Your natural instinct is to try and cough it out. If you suffer from anxiety you know the unpleasant sensation of choking or being suffocated and coughing may seem to be the logical way of getting rid of the “obstruction”. The unpleasant truth is that when you suffer from anxiety the constant lump in your throat is not a physical thing that you can cough up."

Dizziness is often associated with stress and anxiety. “This is for a number of reasons. As stress increases, this can lead to changes in breathing rate, which in turn can change the CO2 levels in the blood. This isn’t dangerous but can cause physical symptoms like dizziness. In addition, the body’s response to stress involves the release of stress hormones. These hormones lead to various changes in the body that enhance our ability to deal with immediate threat (escape or fight – the ‘fight or flight’ response). One such response is that blood is re-directed to the areas that need it for ‘fight or flight’ – blood tends to be redirected from the head and this can lead to dizziness.”

Dystonia "Dystonia disorders cause involuntary movements and prolonged muscle contraction, resulting in twisting body motions, tremor, etc. Dystonia can occur as a result of emotional difficulties or due to a stress reaction."

Epigenetic changes from stress exposure can be passed from traumatized parent to offspring: The children of traumatized people have long been known to be at increased risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and mood and anxiety disorders. One of the most intensively studied groups in this regard are the children of survivors of the Nazi concentration camps. From the work of Yehuda and others, there has been growing evidence that concentration camp survivors and their children might show changes in the epigenetic regulation of genes. Children of traumatized parents are not simply born with a PTSD-like biology; they may inherit traits that promote resilience as well as vulnerability. This study raises important questions about the intergenerational transmission of traits from traumatized parents to their children.

Headache & Migraines  "Emotional stress is one of the most common triggers of migraines and tension headaches.  Migraine sufferers are generally found to be more emotional and highly affected by stressful events. During stressful events certain chemicals in the brain are released to combat the situation (known as the ‘fight or flight’ response). The release of these chemicals can provoke blood vessel changes that can cause migraine headaches.

Anxiety and stress related dizziness and vertigo: " Stress or anxiety may play a role in causing dizziness or, more commonly, may be a contributing factor in dizziness from other causes, such as inner ear diseases."

Low Back Pain "Factors that increase the risk of developing low back pain include smoking, obesity, older age, female gender, physically strenuous work, sedentary work, a stressful job, job dissatisfaction and psychological factors such as anxiety or depression."

Muscle Spasms "Since this symptom is caused by stress and how it affects the body, reducing your body’s stress is the best way to winnow out anxiety and stress caused muscle twitching. As your body’s stress diminishes, this symptom should diminish and eventually disappear."

Low Back Pain  "A substantial proportion of patients who develop chronic low back pain have no identifiable structural pathology capable of explaining the pain. Pain specialists sometimes attribute the pain in these patients to unknown musculoskeletal factors; sometimes the term "idiopathic" is used and means that the cause is entirely unknown. Psychological factors often play a significant role in the development of and adaptation to chronic low back pain  Pre-existing depression, anxiety and stress, together with lack of effective coping skills, may predispose individuals to back pain. Some believe that psychological factors such as these are primary causes of back pain. Distress, whether secondary to physical restriction or to pain, may aggravate the pain and thus the disability. A vicious cycle can be established in which pain causes stress or stress causes pain, and both produce more stress, anxiety and/or depression which causes more low back strain and pain."

Muscle Tension, Persistent Tight Muscles  "Many of those who experience stress and anxiety comment about tight, sore, and painful muscles and/or muscle tension problems in the head and face, mouth, back of the head and neck, back and top of the shoulders, chest, arms, back, legs, hands, stomach, digestive system, elimination tract, groin, and feet, as well as others. Anxiety muscle tension, aches, and pains can persistently affect one area only, can shift and affect another area or areas, and can migrate all over and affect many areas over and over again. Anxiety muscle tension, aches, and pains can come and go rarely, occur frequently, or persist indefinitely"

Anxiety doesn’t just make you feel terrible in your mind, it also has a physical effect on your body. There are obvious and immediate physical symptoms such as increased heart rate and nausea but some sufferers may also experience longer term symptoms that occur as a direct result of the anxiety. - See more at: http://www.nicehair.org/hair-loss-causes/is-anxiety-causing-your-hair-loss#sthash.16rY08WT.dpuf

Menstrual Cramps "Many women report that psychological stress worsens their menstrual pain. Chronic lifestyle stress can have wide-ranging effects on the body, including suppression of the immune system. Psychological stress can also worsen symptoms or delay healing in myriad medical conditions including asthma, cardiovascular disease, infections, and diabetes."

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS or SEID) "The cause of CFS if unknown. A large portion of cases are triggered by an infection and some by trauma. Stress is also present at the onset in almost all cases. Some people believe that CFS is caused by an agent entering the body, while others think it is due to the body's response, possibly to various agents. Since CFS can appear both in clusters and in individual cases, and because it manifests with a wide variety of symptoms and in a wide range of severities, some researchers suggest that CFS may prove to be several or even many illnesses. Future research will determine whether it is one or more illnesses."

Myofascial Pain Syndrome "Stress and anxiety - people who frequently experience stress and anxiety may be more likely to develop trigger points in their muscles which can lead to Myofascial Pain Disorder."

Stress induced chronic prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Stress and emotional health can be  important causative factors in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). When a man experiences stress, anxiety, and tension it can elevate his prolactin levels, which can lead to damage of the immune system and cause inflammation. It can also cause an imbalance in the neuroendocrine system, leading to chronic pain. The tension that is brought on by stress and emotional health can lead to a chronic tension disorder, neuromuscular tension disorder, and other pelvic floor disorders, all which can cause pelvic pain and sometimes urinary, sexual, or bowel trouble.

Ringing in the ears (Tinnitus), stress and anxiety: This new research has found that many people report the onset of ringing in the ears (tinnitus) after experiencing a significant stress or anxiety. So elevated stress, such as stress-response hyperstimulation, is a common cause of ringing in the ears. And this makes sense, since chronic stress, such as that caused by overly apprehensive behavior, increases the electrical activity in the amygdala, which is involved with auditory processing, it stands to reason that chronic stress and its effects can cause ‘phantom’ ringing in the ears due to the way chronic stress adversely affects neuronal production and electrical activity in the brain.

Stress in the classroom can be as contagious as the flu Stress, it seems, is contagious in the classroom—and it’s particularly virulent when transferred between teachers and students. Stress contagion theory posits that while human emotions may seem personal and internally generated, we are in fact biologically sensitive to the emotional tenor of those around us. When the prevailing mood of our company is negative, our bodies have the tendency to respond by releasing hormones that make us feel negative too. The phenomenon has already been observed occurring between mothers and their infants and between romantic partners.

Stiff-Person Syndrome "The association between SPS and anxiety disorders has been reported. Anticipatory anxiety is common in SPS patients, occurring in situations perceived as physically unsafe, such as crossing a busy street or walking unaided in open spaces. These situations may precipitate attacks of increasing stiffness or spasms that result in falls. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and phobic disorders have been described in patients with SPS."

Tension Headache "Stress is also an important factor in tension headaches. Tension headaches can either be episodic or chronic. Episodic tension headache is usually triggered by an isolated stressful situation or a build-up of stress. Daily stress such as from a high-pressure job can lead to chronic tension headaches."

Shoulder and Back Pain "A provocative new book suggest it's not physical problems that cause backache - but emotional tension. Stress and tension, which can come from a number of areas in our lives - family conflicts to stress at work, or even unrealistically high expectations of ourselves. This emotional stress expresses itself in painful physical tension - most commonly in the soft tissues in the neck, the top of the shoulders and shoulder blade, the lower back and the outside of the buttocks. This is where a slow accumulation of anxiety and stress over many months, even years, can cause the arrangement of muscles, nerves, tendons and ligaments to tighten and change - restricting blood and oxygen supply. Muscles deprived of oxygen can build up deposits of lactic acid, triggering pain, spasm, tingling or numbness."

Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome (TMJ) "TMJ refers to how the muscles you use to move your jaw and neck affect your temporomandibular joint in your jaw. Stress can aggravate TMJ by causing overuse of jaw muscles when clenching or grinding teeth (like bruxism). But even if you aren’t seeing signs of bruxism, you may still notice other symptoms of TMJ — such as jaw joint pain, popping and clicking of your jaw or inability to open and close your mouth easily. If you experience any of these, check with your dentist to see if TMJ may be the cause."

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Disclaimer: The above content is intended for general informational purposes and does not constitute any psychological or other medical professional advice. I don't diagnose conditions, nor do I interfere with any treatments given by your medical professional.

*The results may vary from person to person.

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